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Gardening

Our top 12 tomato tips … and a few easy recipes

Every gardener loves tomatoes. We love them in salads, sandwiches, pasta sauces, and salsas. Most of all, we love them fresh from the garden. In fact, they are the most widely grown crop in North America.

Raising tomatoes can be difficult. It calls for practice, attention to detail, and some luck. Here are our best tips for a successful growing season.

Be patient. Don’t plant seeds or set transplants out too early. Tomatoes hate cold soil and cold nights (below 55[degrees]F).

Select tomato varieties that extend your growing season. Grow an early-season variety as well as mid-season and late ones.

Start seeds indoors properly. Use big containers with plenty of room for the roots. Seedlings will develop the best root systems if the roots don’t touch the sides of their containers.

Choose nursery seedlings carefully if you can’t start your own. Select healthy transplants with at least five to seven leaves. If you buy a six-pack, move the seedlings to bigger pots without disturbing the roots. Keep Reading

What are the Some Weed Whacker Reviews When it comes to the Care & Maintenance of the Garden?

It is a well-known fact that everybody likes to spend his/her time outdoors because it gives relaxation, encourages family togetherness & obviously, the nice garden does something for bringing out the unique beauty of home. However, just how do people keep their garden nice & unspoiled?

According to me, for the maintenance of the garden, having the best weed whacker is quite important as it offers an effortless single hand operation. The leading purpose of the best weed whacker is to give the complete look to the garden, the job that people cannot complete by utilizing the garden mower on its own.

Moreover, weed whacker is able to edge the lawn & fix areas or places that several other appliances merely cannot reach. If readers are looking to purchase the weed whacker for their home, then this article can help them in this regard however, reading the weed whacker reviews is equally important. Readers should know that weed whacker could be gas powered and electric.

Furthermore, there are various brands, which are trying their best to capture the marketplace however, not each weed whacker would be up to the mark, which users want. Therefore, it is important to read the below-given information about the some weed whacker reviews in order to make a sound decision. Keep Reading

Gardening by the moon: to have your best garden, follow the Moon

The Moon is that mystical, spherical body that revolves around Earth every 29 days or so. It passes from its “new” phase, when it is missing from the evening sky, to full, when it is a glorious, golden disc lighting the landscape on its nighttime journey, and then back to new again. This dance, during which the Moon visits the entire zodiac 13 times each year, somehow tosses our oceans from shore to shore. It’s utterly amazing and, it influences plant growth, the harvest, and produce preservation.

PLANTING

Earth is most fertile and receptive to the planting of seeds when the Moon is in a water or earth sign. Check the phase of the Moon when you are considering the type of crop to sow or plant: Root and underground vegetables are favored in the dark of the Moon when it is waning, and aboveground crops grow better if they are sown or planted in the light of the Moon, or its waxing phase.

HARVESTING

Keep Reading

7 Flavorful kitchen herbs part 2

OREGANO

Origanum vulgar

In the Garden

Oregano grows to a height of 18 inches, with clusters of tiny white to purple-pink flowers in late summer to fall. Its leaves are dark green, slightly hairy, and aromatic.

It can be grown from seeds if sown in late spring when the danger of frost has passed. Set transplants 10 inches apart in the well-drained dry soil in full sun or closer together for use as edging plants.

Watering is critical while the seeds emerge and when the seedlings are young. As plants mature, gradually taper off the water until the soil is dry more often than it is moist. In summer, divide established clumps and replant. Trim the plants after they flower to prevent them from becoming leggy.

Oregano is a perennial, hardy to Zone 4. In winter, cut back plants to within 2 inches of the soil. Keep Reading

7 Flavorful kitchen herbs part 1

Herbs are easy to grow, and there is room for a few in everyone’s garden. If you don’t have a suitable garden plot, they will grow happily in containers. Most herbs originated in the Mediterranean countries and grow best in full sun.

CHIVES

Allium schoenoprasum

In the Garden

Chives grow to a height of 4 to 24 inches, with mauve, pink, or purple flowers that bloom on the tips of the leaves in early summer. The leaves are long, green, and tubular.

Sow seeds directly in the garden in spring when the air temperature is at least 65[degrees]F. They can also be started earlier indoors. Chives grow best when they are planted at least 6 inches from other plants in fertile, moist soil in a mostly sunny location. Water well throughout spring and summer. Harvest the leaves throughout the growing season. Harvest the flowers when they are fully open but before the color fades and cut chives back after flowering to encourage new leaf growth. Keep Reading

Welcome the least-loved critters

This means snakes. And toads. And bats. And spiders. These are not a witches’ brew, but a cadre of great garden helpers.

With these scaly, warty, scuttling friends, you’ll have fewer insect pests, healthier plants, and lots more fun.

Without them, mosquitoes would eat us alive. Cucumber beetles, cutworms, and their ilk would mow down the garden. Hummingbirds would not be able to make nests. Slugs would devour every host a leaf and then have the petunias for dessert.

PRAISE SNAKES

If you encounter a snake in your backyard, it’s probably a garter snake. If it has stripes that run the length of its body, it is even more likely to be a garter snake. This most common snake in North America, sometimes called the ribbon snake, is no threat at all to humans.

Garter snakes favor long grass, such as is found in a meadow garden, along a fence, or around a pond. They also like densely planted gardens where they can slither unnoticed during their daytime hunting.

The garter snake’s backyard prey include slugs, grasshoppers, and small rodents, including the voles that chew the bark off your fruit trees. Frogs, toads, and salamanders get stalked, too. In water, garter snakes nab tadpoles, fish, and other aquatic prey.

An unmanicured garden or naturalistic part of the yard will make a garter snake feel at home. A garden pool or a birdbath basin set on the ground will satisfy their craving for water. Keep Reading